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Laws of Trinidad and Tobago

Martin George & Company > Laws of Trinidad and Tobago (Page 4)

WAYS TO END A MARRIAGE IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

There is no law that forces you to end your marriage in a certain way. You can end as partners or as adversaries, fighting in court or agreeing in court, breaking the bank or limiting your emotional and financial damage. And at any time, you can change your mind. Dissolution is cooperative. It is the legal way of agreeing on all issues and moving on. It is completely private and in your control, but for the final judgment which is part of the public court record. Procedure: First, a written separation agreement outlining mutual understanding on property, support, and parenting responsibilities. Second,...

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CHILD ABDUCTION

What is Child Abduction? Child Abduction is the offense of wrongfully removing or wrongfully retaining, detaining or concealing a child or baby. Abduction is defined as taking away a person by persuasion, by fraud, or by open force or violence. There are two types of child abduction: parental child abduction and abduction by a stranger. Parental child abductions are the most common type. When one parent abducts his/her child(ren) from the other parent it is often during or after a divorce action and is meant to circumvent the court or act in defiance of a court order regarding legal custody of the...

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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE—WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

The Domestic Violence Act Chap. 45:56 is intended to provide immediate and just relief to victims of domestic violence. The act was passed in 1999 and widened the scope of protection to victims of abuse beyond the infliction of physical violence. Prohibited conduct Domestic violence under the act is defined as physical, sexual, emotional, psychological or financial abuse committed by a person against a spouse, child, any other member of the household or a dependant. Conduct coming within the category emotional and psychological abuse include abusive language, action which can be loosely termed “stalking,” persistent telephone harassment, intimidation and so on. Financial abuse...

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VICTIMISATION AT WORK

The term victimisation is used to describe unfair treatment of a worker by an employer because of some action the worker has taken. Some employment legislation protects you from victimisation if you are seeking to avail of or availing of your rights under the legislation. This means that your employer may not penalise you by dismissal, unfair treatment or an unfavourable change in your conditions of employment. Some legislation refers to this conduct as “penalising” an employee, other legislation refers to it as victimisation. If you are being victimised but not because you are claiming your rights under certain employment...

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WHEN CAN I SUE FOR NEGLIGENCE?

“A tort is a civil wrong (as distinct from a criminal wrong) for which a remedy may be obtained. It is a breach of a duty that the law imposes on persons (Black’s Law Dictionary).” Tort law covers many areas of liability. In this article attention will be given to negligence in road accidents. Road accidents A driver is under a duty to take proper care not to cause injury to other road users. Therefore, he or she must: • keep a proper look-out for other cars and road users • obey traffic rules and signals • not speed • overtake only when it is safe...

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